IEEE Transactions on Electromagnetic Compatibility, vol. 56, no. 3, pp. 520–529, June 2014

Spectrum Analysis Considerations for Radar Chirp Waveform Spectral Compliance Measurements

doi: 10.1109/TEMC.2013.2291540

Charles Baylis; Matthew Moldovan; Robert J. Marks; Jean de Graaf; Lawrence S. Cohen; Robert T. Johnk; Frank H. Sanders

Abstract: The measurement of a radar chirp waveform is critical to assessing its spectral compliance. The Fourier transform for a linear frequency-modulated chirp is a sequence of frequency-domain impulse functions. Because a spectrum analyzer measures the waveform with a finite-bandwidth intermediate-frequency (IF) filter, the bandwidth of this filter is critical to the power level and shape of the reported spectrum. Measurement results are presented that show the effects of resolution bandwidth and frequency sampling interval on the measured spectrum and its reported shape. The objective of the measurement is to align the shape of the measured spectrum with the true shape of the signal spectrum. This paper demonstrates an approach for choosing resolution bandwidth and frequency sampling interval settings using the example of a linear frequency-modulation (FM) chirp waveform.

Keywords: Radar Spectrum Engineering Criteria (RSEC); radar interference; radar emission measurements; spectrum measurement; Fourier transform; frequency domain analysis; chirped pulses

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Lilli Segre, Publications Officer
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(303) 497-3572
LSegre@ntia.gov

For technical information concerning this report, contact:

Robert T. Johnk
Institute for Telecommunication Sciences
(303) 497-3737
bjohnk@ntia.doc.gov

Disclaimer: Certain commercial equipment, components, and software may be identified in this report to specify adequately the technical aspects of the reported results. In no case does such identification imply recommendation or endorsement by the National Telecommunications and Information Administration, nor does it imply that the equipment or software identified is necessarily the best available for the particular application or uses.

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